Chase Makes a Miracle Happen With Persuasive Design: Part I

An impossible task: I don’t know about you, but these days I’m not used to thinking of a credit card company as “my friend” or “on my side”. And the last thing I’m interested in is getting another credit card. Then how is it that in less than 5 minutes Chase convinced me that I absolutely have to have their credit card, and not only that, that I will want to use it as much as possible rather than any other card I have?

Let’s hear from you: I’m actually not going to tell you how they did it —  yet! That’s why this blog is labelled as Part I. I thought it would be more fun if we have everyone go to this site: http://www.chaseblueprint.com/#/home, spend some time looking at all the features of the card, etc, and then come back here and leave a comment with all the effective persuasive design techniques you noticed that they have used. Or if you are more comfortable with just sending me an email, send your comments to weinschenk@gmail.com. (Those of you who have read my book Neuro Web Design: What makes them click? may have an advantage when it comes to coming up with a list of persuasive design ideas they incorporated, but I’m sure everyone will be able to come up with at least a few of the concepts they are using).

I’ll compile the ideas: I’ll wait a few days and see what everyone has to say and then I’ll write Part II and summarize what everyone found.

Chase Makes A Miracle Happen With Persuasive Design Part II
Trust Lesson #2: Building Trust Is Not Enough

5 Replies to “Chase Makes a Miracle Happen With Persuasive Design: Part I”

  1. Animation and graphics featuring "attractive" people "like me" and their trusty companion, the dog. Telling several stories that I can relate to. Made it personal. Use phrases like free, you choose, your finances, your terms, only available through chase.

  2. "you want to learn more? just click on the features…"; it's so easy to comply, it feels like he is looking at me while talking, he's friendly, the dog, the blue "u"

  3. They are persuasive in their use of language ("your" account and for "you"), the simplicity of their introduction to these new features (we could just sit and watch), and the simplicity of the example features they demonstrate. Quite persuasive, but when I dug deeper, I did not find the statement particularly easy to read or understand.

  4. Oh hum, just another credit card touting for business.

    There's nothing on this screenshot that impresses me at all.

    But maybe I'm just cynical about all financial institutions.

    And who wouldn't be after the last two years we've had.

    Now, if they were to actually give me something, then perhaps I'd reciprocate.

    But does anyone really believe a credit card company is going to do them any favours?

    Maybe I have"too much" knowledge to trust them.

    Mark

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