A Conversation With Janus Boye About Peer Learning

Logo for HumanTech podcastJanus Boye joins us from Denmark as a guest in this podcast episode to talk about peer learning. Janus facilitates groups in various locations around the world who regularly meet to talk and connect. We discuss how this type of learning is different from, and possibly better than, attending conferences to keep up your professional skills.

You can check out Janus and learn more about his peer learning groups at his website: jboye.com. 


Human Tech is a podcast at the intersection of humans, brain science, and technology. Your hosts Guthrie and Dr. Susan Weinschenk explore how behavioral and brain science affects our technologies and how technologies affect our brains.

You can subscribe to the HumanTech podcast through iTunes, Stitcher, or where ever you listen to podcasts.

All About Neuro-Marketing With Author Roger Dooley

Logo for HumanTech podcastRoger Dooley joins us as a guest in this podcast episode to talk about neuro-marketing. Roger is the author of Brainfluence, a keynote speaker, and writes several blogs. We talk about the history of neuro-marketing, how neuro-marketing can save your brand, the ethics of it all, and the new book he is working on.

You can check out Roger, his books, his speaking engagements, and his blogs by starting at rogerdooley.com


Human Tech is a podcast at the intersection of humans, brain science, and technology. Your hosts Guthrie and Dr. Susan Weinschenk explore how behavioral and brain science affects our technologies and how technologies affect our brains.

You can subscribe to the HumanTech podcast through iTunes, Stitcher, or where ever you listen to podcasts.

Why Scenarios Lead To Great Design

Logo for HumanTech podcastIn this podcast episode we give examples of how to create design scenarios and discuss why scenarios are critical to designing a great user experience.


Human Tech is a podcast at the intersection of humans, brain science, and technology. Your hosts Guthrie and Dr. Susan Weinschenk explore how behavioral and brain science affects our technologies and how technologies affect our brains.

You can subscribe to the HumanTech podcast through iTunes, Stitcher, or where ever you listen to podcasts.

Episode 1: What Is Behavioral Economics?

Hello friends,

I am planning on embarking on an epic quest, and I want you to come with me on my journey.

Have you heard of behavioral economics? It’s a very fun, interesting field of research that combines decision making, social behavior, and brain science with our everyday human actions.

I’ve been exploring the topic in-depth, and I want to bring you along to share my findings. The purpose of it all is to de-mystify why we humans do what we do. That, after all, really is the point of economics (that and lots of math).

I’ve found 100 Things That Behavioral Economics Can Tell Us About People. How you may ask? I’ve read the research papers. And not the fun “pop-sciencey” articles and books that famous behavioral economists have written. No! I’ve read the research papers behind the books. Hundreds of research papers. I’ve poured over data, figures, tables, and P, R, and T values.

From that wealth of knowledge, I collated, consolidated, and extracted the important (and statistically significant) takeaways from the research. As of this writing it’s 26481 words on 114 pages of research notes alone. And that’s just my notes; I’m just starting now to write this up in a format that you, the readers, can understand without your eyes glazing over in an econometric fog.

Some of the research is about brain mechanisms of behavior. But because we are still in the early stages of being able to see what is actually going on in the brain, most of the studies use the tried and true method of live experiments in the real world to describe and explain the sometimes strange behavior and choices we humans make.

Some of the research results are intuitive, but deserve exploring an answer as to why they are true. Some of the results are not intuitive and make us humans seem stupid. They deserve exploring an answer as well.

Finally, there are big questions about human society and the impact that behavioral economics has on it. Hopefully there are some answers that will provide clarity to those big questions as well.

To help guide you I’ll be using what I call “mind-journeys”. These are detailed narrations, where you can put yourself in the shoes of the person making a decision to help explain these complex topics.

It is going to be so fun! I hope you’ll join me. I hope I can make it to my goal of 100 things. I hope you find the information useful, and fascinating, and maybe it will explain us humans just a little bit more.

Thanks,

Guthrie Weinschenk

Mindfulness Meditation Changes The Brain

The word Mindfulness on a piece of paperI practice mindfulness meditation and am especially fascinated by the research on how a practice such as this changes the brain.
  
If you want to learn more (including a lesson about the science and the research), we’ve created a Mindfulness Meditation online video course and it’s free. You can take it either at our training website, or on Youtube:
 
The one at our website is probably the best way to take the course since it’s on a training platform, has quizzes, and so on.
 
Pass it on to anyone you know that you think would be interested.
 
And if you find it helpful perhaps write a review.

Should Game Companies Be Regulated Like Casinos?

Logo for HumanTech podcastCompanies that produce games are getting sophisticated in their use of behavioral design to get you to spend more money. In this HumanTech podcast episode we discuss whether they’ve crossed a line from video gaming to video gambling, and whether they should be regulated like the casinos are.

 


Human Tech is a podcast at the intersection of humans, brain science, and technology. Your hosts Guthrie and Dr. Susan Weinschenk explore how behavioral and brain science affects our technologies and how technologies affect our brains.

You can subscribe to the HumanTech podcast through iTunes, Stitcher, or where ever you listen to podcasts.

Flashbulb Memories: Vivid But Wrong

Logo for HumanTech podcastIn this podcast episode we talk about a type of memory called “flashbulb” — strong, vivid memories of emotionally charged events that are often inaccurate. And we discuss how collective memories might be changing as media technology changes.

(If you want to read more about memory, check out this blog post on the topic.)


Human Tech is a podcast at the intersection of humans, brain science, and technology. Your hosts Guthrie and Dr. Susan Weinschenk explore how behavioral and brain science affects our technologies and how technologies affect our brains.

You can subscribe to the HumanTech podcast through iTunes, Stitcher, or where ever you listen to podcasts.

Revisiting ALL UPPERCASE LETTERS vs. Upper And Lower Case

Picture of a sad robot faceI’m sometimes surprised by which of my blog posts people get passionate about. Take, for example, my post on whether all uppercase letters are inherently harder to read than upper and lower case. I wrote the post back in 2009, yet someone posted a comment on it today, 8 years later. And last week someone said the post was “utter BS”.

Since the all uppercase topic seems to still be hotly debated, I thought I’d write a quick update. It appears there was a research study done in 2007 that I missed when I first wrote the post. The research confirms, as I said 8 years ago, that:

  • All uppercase letters are not inherently harder to read.
  • All uppercase letters don’t slow down reading speed.
  • In fact, in this study, done with both normal vision and low vision readers, people with low vision performed BETTER with all uppercase letters, presumably because they were larger.
  • This better performance effect with all uppercase disappeared when they increased the size of the font so that it was large even in upper and lower case.
  • All uppercase letters did  not slow down the normal vision people.

It’s a small sample size, but it was statistically significant, and so far as I know there is still no research showing the opposite, so, I’m sticking to the idea for now, that all uppercase letters are not inherently harder to read.

HERE’S THE RESEARCH REFERENCE:

Aries Arditi and Jianna Cho;. Letter case and text legibility in normal and low vision. Vision Res. 2007 Sep; 47(19): 2499–2505. Published online 2007 Aug 6. doi:  10.1016/j.visres.2007.06.010

Mental And Conceptual Models

Logo for HumanTech podcastI’ve been designing stuff for decades, and in my experience there is no more powerful design idea than that of mental models matching conceptual models.

In this podcast episode we talk about mental and conceptual models , what they are, and why they are important to design.

And if you want to read about them too, check out this blog post on the topic.


Human Tech is a podcast at the intersection of humans, brain science, and technology. Your hosts Guthrie and Dr. Susan Weinschenk explore how behavioral and brain science affects our technologies and how technologies affect our brains.

You can subscribe to the HumanTech podcast through iTunes, Stitcher, or where ever you listen to podcasts.